Archive for Recipe

Jane Goodall’s All Good

Jane Goodall’s All Good

Shake with ice then strain into coupe.

Rum and banana are one of my favorite tropical or tiki bases for a drink. The macadamia and the banana liqueurs pair nicely together, but are fairly sweet in combination. So the coffee adds a needed bitterness and depth, which is only enhanced by the molasses blackstrap. Of course we need the acid hit to counter and balance, and the tobacco bitter evens everything out.

The name was contributed by my friend, the Pun-lord Andrew Child. I’ll probably not use any more monkey and ape puns and idioms for my banana drinks.

Yeah, and monkeys might fly out of my butt.

Statler’s Dream

Statler’s Dream

  • 2.0 oz. Apple brandy (Laird’s bonded)
  • 0.5 oz. Kina L’Aéro d’Or
  • 0.25 oz. Drambouie
  • 0.25 oz. Nux Alpina Walnut liqueur

Stir with ice then strain over rocks in tumbler. Spritz with peaty scotch.

Here’s a strong one to put some stuffing in your muppet (sorry). 100 proof apple brandy serves as the base with walnut and Drambouie adding the sweet and nuttiness. To this sort of twist on a Godfather I added a good amount of the bitter Kina for balance. The scotch on the nose is the final touch.

So apples and walnut made me think of a Waldorf salad. Which made me think of the Muppet old codgers. Thus Statler’s Dream, as even in repose he is paired with his heckling partner. Drink up before the curtain (or insult) falls.

Grog Blossom

Grog Blossom

  • 1.0 oz. Hamilton Jamaican Pot Still rum
  • 1.0 oz. Scarlet Ibis
  • 0.75 oz. lime juice
  • 0.5 oz. Passion fruit liqueur (Giffard)
  • 0.5 oz. Green Chartreuse
  • 0.25 oz. Vanilla liqueur (Giffard)
  • 0.25 oz. Allspice Dram (St. Elizabeth)
  • Dash of Bittermens Elemakule Tiki bitters

Shake with ice and strain into tumbler over cracked ice.

Recently I discovered that although I had a tasty passion fruit liqueur in my possession with which I had made a number of ad hoc drinks I had yet to create a specific, recorded drink with it. Thus.

Because it can be rather sweet, especially with the addition of a complementary vanilla, I reached for a funky Jamaican rum and also lots of bright acid to balance. The allspice and bitters brought more depth (and bitterness), but I was still missing something to round out the drink. The chartreuse fixed that for me with its herbal kick.

Grog of course was the traditional nautical concoction of rum and lime. Here I have taken that and embellished (as many a tropical or tiki drink does), making the Grog Blossom I think a fitting name, and certainly a possible result of consuming these on a regular basis!

Maururu

Maururu

Stir with ice and strain into coupe. Garnish with a cherry.

I love tiki. Don’t always have fruit. So here is one of my go-to drinks for such occasions. Fortunately, the Leopold Bros. cherry liqueur can add a great tart splash. Coconut and cherry with the rum, plus a little bitterness from the Averna and Angostura, and I don’t miss not having the fruit at all. Thank you, Leopold Bros!

Oh, Maururu is Tahitian for “Thank you.” You’re welcome!

Farewell Kiss

Farewell Kiss

Shake with ice and strain into coupe. Garnish with cherry and lime.

Ok, here’s a confession. I love The Last Word, but I really dislike Maraschino liqueur. So often when I want that makeup for a drink I explore other ways to achieve it.

Here I really wanted that juniper aspect of the gin to shine through, so I lean heavily on the Copper & Kings offering as the base. For sweet, I opt for cassis, which can also add some tartness which allows me to pull back on the lime. Some additional sweet and bitterness comes from the Cocchi, and the piney bitters for me help to highlight that Juniper in the gin.

I made this drink at the end of 2020, so turning that last word into a farewell kiss seemed the perfect gesture. Although in retrospect I was too polite with my goodbye.

Shiodome

Shiodome

  • 2.0 oz. Japanese gin (Roku)
  • 0.5 oz. yuzu liqueur (Choya)
  • 0.25 oz. lychee liqueur (Massenez)
  • 0.25 oz. ginger liqueur (King’s)
  • dash of yuzu bitters (Miracle Mile)

Stir with ice and strain into Nick and Nora.

Not much to explain on this one. I started with a Japanese gin and wanted to highlight it with other Japanese ingredients. The yuzu liqueur offers enough acid that no citrus is needed, but more sweetness is necessary. Thus the ginger and lychee came to play. Finally, some yuzu bitters were added for balance. A nice, bright yet subtle drink.

I named this Shiodome as that was my first real introduction to Tokyo, off the plane and train. For a couple of years I went out fairly regularly for a job, around once a quarter, and the Shiodome district was where my clients — and my hotel — were located.

Kanpai!

Elephant in the Room

Elephant in the Room

Shake with ice and strain into coupe.

This one started out with me playing with the rhubarb and ginger liqueur. I wanted to pair that with the strawberry, but didn’t want too much additional sweetness so split that gin base with the Elephant London Dry, which I felt offered enough botanical interest to stand up to the other flavors. The Yellow Chartreuse smoothed things out and broadened the herbaceousness even further, but the drink needed some acid so a little lemon was added. The bitters completed the picture.

Yes, the name came directly because of the gin. Change the gin and you have to modify the name. Rules are rules.

Boston to Paris

Boston to Paris

  • 2.0 oz. Bully Boy Merchant gin
  • 0.5 oz. apricot liqueur (Rothman and Winter)
  • 0.25 oz. Cocchi Americano
  • 0.25 oz. lemon juice
  • 2 dashes absinthe

Shake with ice and strain into coupe. Garnish with a lemon twist.

Bright and refreshing, with the anise highlighting the apricot sweetness against the gin’s botanicals. An elegant sipper for either side of the Atlantic.

Year of the Fire Monkey

Year of the Fire Monkey

  • 1.5 oz. reposado tequila
  • 0.75 oz. banana liqueur (Tempus Fugit)
  • 0.5 oz. Ancho Reyes Poblano liqueur
  • 0.5 oz. lemon juice
  • 0.25 oz. Averna
  • dash of Angostura bitters

Shake with ice and strain into coupe.

I’m not sure what led me down a path of bananas and chilies, but it works. I stuck with tequila to match the chile liqueur, and added lemon for some acid then some bitter amaro and Angostura.

The drink has a nice sweetness and bite. I thought the sign from the Chinese Zodiac was fitting for a name. Too bad it’s not for 2020. But the Water Rat doesn’t sound like a good drink. Though perhaps it is appropriate for the year thus far.

Tin Goose

Tin Goose

  • 1.5 oz. Dovetail Florida rum
  • 0.5 oz. Barcardi Reserva 8 yr.
  • 0.5 oz. creme de cacao (Tempus Fugit)
  • 0.5 oz. lemon juice
  • 0.25 oz. Lillet Blanc

Shake with ice and strain into coupe.

Here’s a rum twist on a Twentieth Century Cocktail, one of my favorite gin drinks. Obviously rum is subbed for the gin, and the ratios were then tweaked to my taste.

Since the original drink’s name comes from the train transport between Chicago and New York City, I thought in this case with the Florida and (originally) Cuban rum it was only appropriate to name the drink after the common transport on that route back during Prohibition, the Ford Trimotor, nicknamed the Tin Goose.

There have been other Tin Goose cocktails, I must admit, but it seemed too perfect for this drink to not use. And the drink will be gone before anyone notices.